I’m so tired of the snarking about Senator Stevens’ use of the word tube. Really, what’s the difference between his tubes and the commonly used pipe, as in a fat pipe? Someone help me out here.

weblog-editor-tease.PNG An observation. The last couple of posts point back to my other blog. It’s tricky with two blogs, deciding what to post to which. The truth is, I want to post just about everything to both. I guess I could set up cross-posting, but I’m not sure that’s the right solution. Posting to one and pointing to it seems like the best solution, more true to what actually happened somehow. I’m open to ideas.

Also on developer.podshow.com, a couple of posts about great podcasts that I listened to on my commute today. Both were just exceptional, home runs in my book. This is why I got into podcasting.

A piece of advice for newbie syndication hackers: there’s just no telling what some people will stick in their RSSes. 🙂 🙂 🙂

My Legend

The new PodShow+ site, unleashing pretty darn soon, has a personal bio feature called “The Legend of me”. I just filled mine out. Here’s what I wrote:

I’m a programmer with an apetite for timeshifted media. That pretty much sums it up. In 2000, before I’d heard of RSS, I was using Voquette Media Manager to record Real streams of This American Life, which I’d lovingly burn to CD and listen to on long car trips. Later, in the days of “audio blogging”, I used the Radio Userland news aggregator to automatically pull MP3 files from enclosure-bearing RSS from Dave Winer, Chistopher Lydon and Doug Kaye. I’d then locate these on my hard drive and drag them, one at a time, into the media management software for my Neuros MP3 player. It worked, sort of, but was too much effort, and there was still too little content (especially after Chris took a break) for practical daily use. Adam Curry switched me back on in 2004 with a steady stream of daily content, developer feedback, feature ideas and a critical insight that made the medium: we needed automatic sync to the listening device. The early innovations in podcasting were nearly all Mac-only, which as a Windows user drove me nuts. Erik de Jonge’s “iSpider” project had a decent command-line Python/Applescript codebase, and were up for doing a cross-platform GUI product, which is where I wanted to go. Bringing in some modest COM knowledge that Pieter Overbeeke’s “i-podder” javascript helped me learn, I joined the iSpider team and Lemon was born. Nearly two years and one Ceast and Desist later, Lemon is now known as Juice and has accumulated over 2 million downloads. Along the way, Martijn Venrooy and I built the GigaDial “podstation factory” (October 2004), and in Fall 2005 I joined PodShow and moved my family from Boston to San Francisco. At PodShow I do a mix of engineering (DGAP, Golden Tickets), developer relations (developer.podshow.com, DevCasts), technical reviews of potential partners and, when anyone will listen :-), talent scouting. I’m bullish on New Media and on the lookout for cool new stuff to build, to make listening and viewing better.

Pretty verbose — it fills the alotted space on my profile page — yet it barely scratches the surface.